26 foods Canadians get to enjoy, but Americans can’t

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theloop.ca   26 foods Canadians get to enjoy, but Americans can’t

Denette Wilford




Poutine, bacon and maple syrup might be Canada’s best-known foods, but there are some other delicious delicacies the rest of the world are missing out on. Can’t wait for them to go international? You could always send yourself a care package from True North Delivery Co., which delivers homegrown goodies to the US. (We’re salivating for the Mighty Mittens Edition box, ourselves). And Americans may need to get crafty, because a deal struck between a British exporter and Hershey’s has established that no British chocolates will set foot in the United States. These are dark times if you’re not Canadian, so pour one out for these 26 items (and the people who just can’t get them):





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  • Flake Bar A British export company has organized a deal with Hershey's to make the beloved Flake bar a thing of the past in the United States. Photo credit: Cadbury
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  • Ketchup chips Orange fingertips from cheese puffs and Doritos is one thing; now, red fingers from a bag of sometimes sweet but mostly salty chips is a whole different — and yummy — kind of special.Lays Canada
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  •  Toffee Crisp The deal struck with Hershey's in the United States to ban British confectioneries doesn't just impact Cadbury. In fact, it impacts all British chocolates. Because Toffee Crisp resembles the packaging of Reese's Peanut Butter Cups, it's considered bad for business.Photo credit: Nestle
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  • BeaverTails The fried dough treat was actually born in Hungary but calling it a "BeaverTail" and throwing all kinds of toppings (chocolate, fruit, cinnamon sugar, etc.) on it was a stroke of Canadian marketing genius.Getty Images
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  • Crush cream soda You just need that sweet, tart, fizzy goodness from the pink can or bottle? Only in Canada, people. Only in Canada.Flickr
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  • Game meat Bison, venison, boar and caribou can be found at most Canadian butchers, restaurants and homes. Come on, not everything tastes like chicken.Thinkstock

  • Bannock The tradional Scottish flat bread was adopted by North American Natives, including Canada's Inuit, and has since been given a gourmet treatment in culinary circles.Thinkstock
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  • Maltesers Another reason to love Canada? We haven't imposed a British import ban like the States, so we can still get Maltesers. Photo credit: Mars, Incorporated
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  • Nanaimo bars The best part of these treats that originated in Naniamo, B.C.? No baking required. All you need is butter, sugar, vanilla, an egg, coconut, graham cracker crumbs, walnuts, chocolate, cocoa, milk, icing sugar and vanilla custard. OK, it sounds like a lot of work but, really, it's quite easy.Thinkstock
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  • Yorkie The United States doesn't like the competition this poses to the beloved York Peppermint Patty. But in Canada, you can choose either. Photo credit: Nestle
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  • Montreal bagels New York might think they own the bagel market but Montreal's version tends to be sweeter and smaller — a good thing if you're counting your calories as a bagel is equivalent to three or four slices of bread. Thinkstock
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  •  Kraft Dinner Americans might call it mac and cheese, but Canadians do it better. Pasta topped with milk, butter and the signature orange cheese powder (though the white cheddar version is just as good) is sometimes just what the lazy doctor ordered.Kraft Canada
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  •  Swiss Chalet dipping sauce The restaurant chain's rotisserie chicken and fries are delicious in their own right but without the dipping sauce, you may as well have an empty plate in front of you. You can also buy the packets in grocery stores — but it's just not the same as getting the piping hot thick gravy in those little cups.Swiss Chalet
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  • Montreal smoked meat Kosher-style smoked beef brisket with special herbs and spices? Yes, please. Throw that on a Montreal bagel and that's about as Canadian as you can get. French-Canadian, that is.Thinkstock
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  •  Kraft peanut butter We might not have Jif but Kraft's PB is arguably the best on the market.Kraft Canada
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  • Donairs If you like your snacks sweet, meaty and greasy, than the East Coast wrap/sandwich is for you. Heavily spiced ground meat that's shaved off a spit, seared on a flattop, and placed in a pita with tomatoes and onions. But it's the signature sauce that'll have you begging for more. Slurp.Getty
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  • Coffee Crisp It's a nice light snack, so nice and light that you don't feel guilty for scarfing down an entire bar of milk chocolate and crunchy wafer with the mocha flavour.Nestlé Canada
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  • Split pea soup The thick concoction of dried yellow split peas and a smoked ham hock is all thanks to the Québécois. De rien.Thinkstock
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  • Cadbury Dairy Milk Hershey's even views the humble milk chocolate bar as competition, so it is out as well. But, breaking things down, a British chocolate bar's main ingredient is milk, while an American chocolate bar's main ingredient is sugar. Huh. Photo credit: Cadbury
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  • Canada Dry ginger ale You can get ginger ale anywhere, we suppose, but the tastiest brand comes from Canada Dry. Of course.Canada Dry
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  • Tourtière The savoury meat pie from Quebec is made with ground pork, veal or beef. French-Canadians usually bust out the delicacy around the holidays but it's a homey dish that is perfect for those days when you just need a little comfort food. Thinkstock
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  • Jos Louis The snack cakes are covered in chocolate, stuffed with white icing and can't be gobbled up anywhere but here. A shame. (Not really.)Vachon
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  •  Hickory Sticks You might not have enjoyed a bag of the best "simulated potato sticks" in a while, but that smoky flavour is incomparable.Frito Lay Canada
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  • Smarties The colourful chocolates are one of the most popular candies around, seen most often in and around Halloween. But, Canadians, if you happen to be in the States and have a hankering for the treats, it should be noted that American Smarties are totally different than our take on it. There they’re what we call Rockets, coincidentally also a Halloween staple.Nestlé Canada
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  • Butter tarts What's not to love? Butter, sugar, syrup, eggs and even more butter in a pastry shell. Enjoy one with raisins, nuts or nothing at all; these sweet treats should be a staple in anyone's house, any time. Thinkstock
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  • Kit Kat No, the United States does not want to give you a break. This beloved British creation will no longer be imported by the United States. Canada, however, gets all the breaks. Break us off a piece of that magic!Photo credit: Nestle
   
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